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Red Hot City

ebook
An incisive examination of how growth-at-all-costs planning and policy have exacerbated inequality and racial division in Atlanta.

Atlanta, the capital of the American South, is at the red-hot core of expansion, inequality, and political relevance. In recent decades, central Atlanta has experienced heavily racialized gentrification while the suburbs have become more diverse, with many affluent suburbs trying to push back against this diversity. Exploring the city's past and future, Red Hot City tracks these racial and economic shifts and the politics and policies that produced them.

Dan Immergluck documents the trends that are inverting Atlanta's late-twentieth-century "poor-in-the-core" urban model. New emphasis on capital-driven growth has excluded low-income people and families of color from the city's center, pushing them to distant suburbs far from mass transit, large public hospitals, and other essential services. Revealing critical lessons for leaders, activists, and residents in cities around the world, Immergluck considers how planners and policymakers can reverse recent trends to create more socially equitable cities.

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Publisher: University of California Press

Kindle Book

  • Release date: September 16, 2022

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9780520387652
  • Release date: September 16, 2022

EPUB ebook

  • ISBN: 9780520387652
  • File size: 14410 KB
  • Release date: September 16, 2022

Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB ebook

subjects

Business Nonfiction

Languages

English

An incisive examination of how growth-at-all-costs planning and policy have exacerbated inequality and racial division in Atlanta.

Atlanta, the capital of the American South, is at the red-hot core of expansion, inequality, and political relevance. In recent decades, central Atlanta has experienced heavily racialized gentrification while the suburbs have become more diverse, with many affluent suburbs trying to push back against this diversity. Exploring the city's past and future, Red Hot City tracks these racial and economic shifts and the politics and policies that produced them.

Dan Immergluck documents the trends that are inverting Atlanta's late-twentieth-century "poor-in-the-core" urban model. New emphasis on capital-driven growth has excluded low-income people and families of color from the city's center, pushing them to distant suburbs far from mass transit, large public hospitals, and other essential services. Revealing critical lessons for leaders, activists, and residents in cities around the world, Immergluck considers how planners and policymakers can reverse recent trends to create more socially equitable cities.

Expand title description text